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5. Youth subculture
.25.02.15

5. Youth subculture

Themes in the curriculum: Youth as a social group. Peculiarities of the youth subculture.

Themes in the curriculum: Youth as a social group. Peculiarities of the youth subculture.

Themes in the curriculum: Youth as a social group. Peculiarities of the youth subculture.

Aims:

  • Understanding the causes of membership in informal youth groups 
  • Seeing the social significance and social risks connected with membership in various youth groups    
  • Seeing positive alternatives to membership in antisocial and asocial youth groups  
  • Helping to form an active civil stance.   

Target group: school years 10-11

Duration — 1 hour 30 minutes

Short description

The work begins with watching a video-collage on the diversity of informal youth subcultures.

The participants then take part in a short questionnaire on the social risks of belonging to extremist youth organisations. The results of the questionnaire are then processed by the computer system, after which each participant can see the general opinion of the group and compare it with his own answers.

Next comes a discussion, as a result of which the participants understand that extremism leads to human victims, and that anybody can become the victim of extremists.

After this, the group is divided into three subgroups. Trainers lead a short discussion brief in each subgroup on the pressing needs of young people that are realised by means of membership in youth subculture. These are written up into a list. After the subgroups present their results to the wider group, a discussion is held, focusing on the understanding of youth subculture as a predictable response to the pressing needs of young people. The conclusion is made that these needs are also catered for in extremist youth group.

The participants then return to their small groups, in which they select one need from the general list which, in their opinion, is most important to youths. A brainstorming session is held in which the schoolchildren seek alternative, socially useful methods of satisfying these needs by means of creating school projects.

A double-rounded selection process is then conducted, first on grounds of realism, then in terms of the amount of interest in the realisation of the ideas. The schoolchildren talk about their own potential roles in implementing the chosen project.

In this way, the schoolchildren see the spectrum of positive alternatives and are warmed up towards project work.

If the schools are willing, these projects can actually be implemented.